Traumatic Brain Injury Statistics

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are some of the most devastating and life-threatening injuries someone can sustain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), TBIs account for 30 percent of all injury deaths in the United States, with approximately 138 people dying every day[1]. Even if the TBI doesn’t lead to death, it can cause significant effects in the days and weeks following the injury, and in the most severe cases, permanent disabilities.

The most common causes of TBIs include:

  • Falls: Falls, whether they are caused by slipping in the shower, falling off a high perch, falling down the stairs, etc., are the most common causes of TBIs, especially in young children and senior citizens.
  • Sports Injuries: A variety of sports, including baseball, boxing, lacrosse, etc. can cause TBIs. In the past few years, football has come under increasing scrutiny due to the sheer number of TBIs its players suffer. The issue has become so prevalent that a major motion picture, Concussion, was released last Christmas about the ongoing debate in the sport.
  • Explosions / Combat Injuries: Researchers are still studying how explosions affect the brain, but many believe the pressure wave caused by the explosion disrupts the brain’s function as it passes through. Explosions can also cause TBIs through impacts from debris or shrapnel, penetrating wounds, or falls / collisions with objects.
  • Vehicle Collisions: TBIs are one of the most common injuries caused by vehicle collisions – whether the vehicle is a car, motorcycle, bicycle, etc.
  • Violence: Researchers estimate that 20 percent of TBIs are caused by acts of violence like child or domestic abuse, gunshot wounds, shaken baby syndrome, etc.

According to the CDC, TBIs accounted for around 2.2 million emergency room visits, 280,000 hospitalizations, and more than 50,000 deaths in 2010 in the United States. Between 2001 and 2010, emergency room visits for TBIs increased by 70 percent, while hospitalizations increased by 11 percent. Only death rates decreased, with 7 percent fewer TBI-related deaths at the end of the decade compared to the beginning.

Between 2006 and 2010, the CDC reported that the most common causes of death for each age group were:

  • Falls accounted for the highest percentage of deaths among senior citizens – people over 65 years old.
  • Vehicle collisions accounted for the highest percentage of deaths among people between the ages of 5 and 24.
  • Violence accounted for the highest percentage of deaths among children 4 years old and younger.

Between 2006 and 2010, the most common causes of TBIs that didn’t lead to death for each age group were:

  • Falls accounted for the highest percentage of hospitalizations for every age group, except for people aged 15 to 24, where the leading cause was violence.
  • Vehicle collisions accounted for the highest percentage of emergency room visits among people between the ages of 15 and 44, while falls accounted for the highest percentage in all other age groups.

TBIs are serious injuries, and can lead to permanent complications for victims. If you or a loved one sustained a TBI due to someone’s negligence, contact Givens Givens Sparks today. Our Tampa traumatic brain injury attorneys believe in fighting for justice through financial compensation, and have the skills and experience necessary to create the strongest case that best suits your needs. Visit our website today for a free case consultation, or call us at (813) 336-3348 to set up a meeting with one of our traumatic brain injury lawyers.

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